Amy Loosemore

Thoughts from a Romance Publisher's Geek in Residence

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"I spent four months trying to kiss you and the last six weeks trying to figure out how I managed to fuck everything up. All I want now is to make it right, to make you see how sorry I am and why you should give me another chance. And I just want to know—are you rooting for me? Are you hoping I pull this off?"

"I’m rooting for you," she whispered.

Aaaaand now I want to re-read Fangirl

(Source: onebookcantransformyou, via rainbowrowell)

Filed under fangirl books ya rainbow rowell

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mentalflossr:

The show’s 18 episodes featured snippets of more than 120 songs, including Joan Jett’s “Bad Reputation” in the opening credits. It set the tone for the show, but it wasn’t cheap. Clearing songs by Van Halen, KISS, and The Who—just to name a few—required a lot of paperwork and ate up much of the show’s budget . It also later delayed the DVD release. Fox removed most of the music when it picked up Freaks and Geeks re-runs to avoid paying extra fees.
20 Things You Might Not Have Known About ‘Freaks and Geeks’

Awww this show. I didn’t watch it until it was on DVD.

mentalflossr:

The show’s 18 episodes featured snippets of more than 120 songs, including Joan Jett’s “Bad Reputation” in the opening credits. It set the tone for the show, but it wasn’t cheap. Clearing songs by Van Halen, KISS, and The Who—just to name a few—required a lot of paperwork and ate up much of the show’s budget . It also later delayed the DVD release. Fox removed most of the music when it picked up Freaks and Geeks re-runs to avoid paying extra fees.

20 Things You Might Not Have Known About ‘Freaks and Geeks’

Awww this show. I didn’t watch it until it was on DVD.

Filed under freaks and geeks tv

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theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

Filed under Writing tips writing writing advice john steinbeck

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Geek Links for April 12, 2014

1) How Game of Thrones has changed baby names.

2) FXX is going to air every episode of The Simpsons in a 12-day marathon starting August 21.

3) New trailer for How to Train Your Dragon 2 — but it’s one of those trailers that make you feel like you say in the whole movie in two and a half minutes.

4) Captain America’s list of things to learn about apparently changes depending on your country. But not Canada, because apparently nothing noteworthy happened to Canada in 70 years. Via Dear Author.

Filed under Game of Thrones geekery links the simpsons how to train your dragon captain america movies

186 notes &

NBC asks viewers for better sitcom ideas | EW.com

blackgirlstalking:

We’ve talked about the very white, bro-centric world of TV comedy before, so this is (maybe) good news for those who fall outside of that realm, and don’t necessarily have access to the more traditional paths to professional comedy production. We say it all the time: we need new voices for PoC content as well as the opportunities for production of that content. Hopefully this opens the doors for some new and interesting stuff to happen outside of the innovative work coming out of the world of web series. 

- Fatima 

(via yabookscentral)

Filed under tv